This Week in Conservative Lies

Conservative lies are legion and this week in Conservative lies is no exception.But it’s also an occasion to recognize and highlight some of the most egregious.This week, we’ll look at two falsehoods that have taken off over the last month.In a story about the American Dream, the National Review magazine used a photo of a…

Published by admin inJuly 20, 2021
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Conservative lies are legion and this week in Conservative lies is no exception.

But it’s also an occasion to recognize and highlight some of the most egregious.

This week, we’ll look at two falsehoods that have taken off over the last month.

In a story about the American Dream, the National Review magazine used a photo of a baby as the caption of an article claiming, “What a way to spend a rainy Sunday.”

The article went on to claim that this photo was taken at a baby shower and that the photo was of an actual baby.

But the photo that the magazine used was actually taken at an annual baby shower in a city near Washington, D.C. The photo had been cropped and then rephotographed in the photo studio in order to provide a slightly different perspective, the story claimed.

The magazine also used the photo to say that the United States “has the lowest teen pregnancy rate in the world.”

The photo in question was actually of an older woman in a pink dress.

It wasn’t taken in a hospital, and it was not even the year 2000.

This story, along with several others like it, has been widely circulated, and many conservative pundits have defended the publication by claiming it was just an innocent photo mislabeled as an actual photo.

However, this photo is in fact a genuine image from a 2010 event that took place in Washington, DC, and was taken by the National Press Photographers Association.

The photographer who took the photo, John S. Schulz, is an award-winning photographer whose work has been featured in Time Magazine, Newsweek, Newsweek’s The View, the New York Times, CNN, Fox News, and other publications.

The National Press Photographer Association, the association that represents National Press Photo and the photographers that cover the National Mall, said in a statement to BuzzFeed News, “This photo was provided to us by a photographer who had been selected to photograph the event.”

Schulz told BuzzFeed News that the image is from a 2009 event and was only used to demonstrate the power of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which is located in the Washington, which he calls “one of the greatest black American cultural institutions in the country.”

He said that the photographer did not ask him to take the photo because he was unaware of its origins and didn’t want to offend anyone.

The group did not respond to a request for comment.

This was the same photo that was used in the “The Birth of the First African American President” episode of The View on Monday, February 17, and in the Fox News segment on Wednesday, February 20.

In that segment, Fox host Bill O’Reilly falsely claimed that “President Barack Obama’s birth certificate shows that he was born in Kenya.”

The Washington Post later retracted this claim and said that “the document, signed by the president, does not show the Kenyan birth.”

The Post said that this document was signed by “a Kenyan official” who is “well aware of the issue.”

The post went on, “Obama’s birth record was certified by a Kenyan official, who has acknowledged the discrepancy and has promised to do his own review.”

On Tuesday, February 21, The Post also retracted the story, saying, “The Washington Post regrets the error.”

A few days later, The Washington Times retracted its story on the “Birth of the American Prophet” segment and issued a statement that read in part, “We regret the error in a story we published on Sunday, February 19.

It was based on incorrect information.”

The Times apologized on Wednesday for the error, but added that it had made a mistake in a subsequent story published a day earlier.

“We have apologized to those who were offended by the erroneous story, and we want to make clear we are continuing to address the story and its misperceptions.

We believe we have done our best to address these concerns and that we are not going to repeat this mistake.”

But the problem was only compounded by another false story in the National Enquirer, which also used a “babies crying” photo to falsely suggest that President Barack Obama was born outside the United State.

In the Enquirers article, “Baby Jesus,” which ran on March 5, 2011, the writer claimed that, “After President Obama was elected, a woman named Maria Cusack went to the White House to have a baby.”

The Enquireries article, which went on for three pages, falsely claimed, “Maria Cusak, a Florida woman who has been the subject of rumors for years, was a ‘birthday girl’ and that she delivered a baby on March 8, 2011.”

The writer claimed she had a “baby with a black man,” which the story referred to as “a black man.”

The story was published in the Enqueres version of the Enquires.

The article also said that Cusaks birth was “the first time that black men have ever had a child.”

The problem was not limited to the Enques.

The Washington Examiner ran a story